EcoKarma is about connecting the teachings of yoga with ecology to create a Bliss Army of yogis in selfless service of Nature. We want to create more reverence for Nature and use this as fuel to protect it for generations to come.

What is EcoKarma

In Blissology, we believe that quiet observation of nature will quickly open us up to joy, awe, peace, connection and reverence. As the world becomes more digital and paved over, it’s easy to loose this great truth. The main work of my life is to make sure that Nature remains the deepest source of our mental, physical and spiritual health. As a surfer I see the ocean as my temple, my playground, my gym and often our supermarket.

We are so intimately connected to the ocean. Every tear and every drop of sweat comes and goes from the ocean; Every second breath we take is produced by the plankton in our Oceans. Yet, the ocean is in incredible trouble. It is becoming more acidic and warm, which spells disaster for our precious underwater ecosystems.

When I see what is happening in our ocean, it makes me angry. Yogic wisdom has helped me transmute my anger into energy for positive change. EcoKarma is a call for ecologists and yogis to manifest the changes they want to see in the world with love in their hearts.

Nothing has shaped my body, mind and soul like the ocean. The ocean is a shrine of interconnection and lives at the heart of my spiritual and movement practice. This year as I turn 50, I realize that leaving a cleaner ocean for the next generations to come is everything. Join me to to help save our imperiled oceans by donating to my IndieGoGo campaign. All proceeds go to our Blissology EcoKarma Project. It would be the best Birthday Present ever!!!

Why Coral Reefs?

The Coral Reefs are like the rain forests of the ocean. They cover a mere 1% of the ocean floor yet astoundingly they are home to approximately 25% of all marine life!

Today coral reefs around the world are in danger. Some estimates show how approximately 10% of the world’s coral reefs are dead and about 60% of the world’s reefs are at risk due to human-related activities. By the 2030s, 90% of reefs are expected to be at risk from both human activities and climate change.